Tag Archives: water

Here is Your Elevator Pitch Against “LEED Equivalent” Projects

Green Building

Here is Your Elevator Pitch Against “LEED Equivalent” Projects

Originally published on December 6, 2016 by BNP Media through the Building Enclosure Blog. Have you ever been asked to design or construct a project “to LEED’s standard” without actually submitting for certification? This can initially sound like an attractive idea to a client. After all, as long as the owner knows the project is aligned with LEED, why pay the funds to get a plaque on the wall?   Lack of Accountability with LEED Equivalent The problem is, an….

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Is a Vapor Retarder Necessary in a Low-Slope Roof Assembly?

Green Building

Is a Vapor Retarder Necessary in a Low-Slope Roof Assembly?

Originally published on October 7, 2016 by BNP Media through the Building Enclosure Blog. . If you have designed or built a low-slope roof with a single-ply membrane, at some point you will be confronted with this simple question: Is the vapor retarder necessary? With considerable costs at stake, the prospect of omitting a vapor retarder is always a precarious notion and one that merits careful consideration of the project-specific dynamics at play. Consider the Entire Assembly In order to….

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We Must Address Our Aging Infrastructure

Green Building

We Must Address Our Aging Infrastructure

Originally published on September 22, 2015 by BNP Media through the Walls & Ceilings Blog. Infrastructure is essential for every family, community, and business to function. It encompasses everything from the water that comes out of your faucet to the Hoover Dam; from the road in your neighborhood to our expansive interstate highway network. Planes, trains, ports, the electric grid, solid way conveyance – it all falls under the umbrella of infrastructure. It is the foundation that connects society, driving….

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Basics of Bulk Water Management through Rainscreens

Green Building

Basics of Bulk Water Management through Rainscreens

Originally published on April 22, 2015 by BNP Media through the Walls & Ceilings Blog. The building envelope must face a number of damage functions: bulk and capillary water, air-born water, vapor, radiation (ultraviolet degradation), pests, and people. But even in dry climates, water in all its forms perhaps poses the greatest challenge to building performance and longevity – and bulk water is public enemy number one. In general, there are four basic approaches to bulk water management in a….

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Water: The Ideal Thermal Mass? (EDC Magazine Edition)

Green Building

Water: The Ideal Thermal Mass? (EDC Magazine Edition)

A classic example of a roofpond application, the Atascadero House (Atascadero, Calif.) was designed with the assistance of Harold R. Hay and built in 1973. Photo credit: John Reynolds. Thermal mass is an essential component for any passive solar heating or cooling strategy. It’s useful because it absorbs solar energy and provides inertia against interior temperature fluctuations despite diurnal temperature cycles. Design teams can introduce thermal mass into projects in a number of ways. Baked clay, adobe and various types….

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Putting the 2012 Indianapolis Heatwaves and Drought into Perspective

Green Building

Putting the 2012 Indianapolis Heatwaves and Drought into Perspective

Photograph by Ewan Bellamy. Some rights reserved under a Creative Commons license. You heard about it all over the streets of Indianapolis during the Super Bowl festivities. It was unseasonably warm in the Circle City. Patrons swarmed the Super Bowl Village along Georgia Street – some wearing little more than a heavy sweatshirt. As the host city, Indianapolis was bracing itself to deal with several feet of snow and here we were – experiencing the kind of weather Dallas was hoping for….

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Water: The Ideal Thermal Mass

Green Building

Water: The Ideal Thermal Mass

What if I told you that I knew about a building product that: Has three times the thermal storage capacity of concrete. Has only half the weight of brick. Is completely non-toxic. Is completely transparent. Is inherently fire-resistant. Is abundantly available in the U.S. at virtually zero cost (at least for the time being). That’s right. I’m talking about water. The nectar of life. Throughout the history of passive solar heating, there are many accounts of innovative thinkers using water as a thermal….

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