Tag Archives: building science

Defining Mass Walls through Heat Capacity

Green Building

Defining Mass Walls through Heat Capacity

Originally published on February 12, 2015 by BNP Media through the Architectural Roofing & Waterproofing Blog. There are significant differences in the prescriptive requirements of mass walls versus other above-grade walls. Using ASHRAE 90.1-2007 as example, above-grade walls for a steel-framed nonresidential building in Climate Zone 5 will need a minimum of R-13 insulation AND a continuous insulation layer of at least R-7.5. However, the building’s mass wall assemblies would only be required to exhibit a continuous layer of R-11.4….

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Analog Analysis

Green Building

Analog Analysis

Lam Partners Principal Keith Yancey demonstrates model testing on the heliodon with students at the Boston Architectural College during the Fall 2015 Intensive Week. Photograph by Daniel Overbey. Originally published on August 25, 2015 by BNP Media through the Walls & Ceilings Blog. Digital tools are vital (I rely on them virtually everyday), but sometimes in order to really understand a phenomena we have to get a bit closer. That’s where analog analysis tools come in handy. Something special happens when….

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Comparing Solar Heat Gain Coefficients (SHGC) and Shading Coefficients (SC)

Green Building

Comparing Solar Heat Gain Coefficients (SHGC) and Shading Coefficients (SC)

Originally published on May 18, 2015 by BNP Media through the Walls & Ceilings Blog. I was recently discussing glazing properties with a mechanical engineer for an energy model of a corporate headquarters we are working on. We discussed U-factors first and then moved on to shading properties. We had this awkward moment where he asked me what the shading coefficients were. “You mean the solar heat gain coefficients?” “No, the shading coefficients,” he responded. This caught me off guard…..

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Basics of Bulk Water Management through Rainscreens

Green Building

Basics of Bulk Water Management through Rainscreens

Originally published on April 22, 2015 by BNP Media through the Walls & Ceilings Blog. The building envelope must face a number of damage functions: bulk and capillary water, air-born water, vapor, radiation (ultraviolet degradation), pests, and people. But even in dry climates, water in all its forms perhaps poses the greatest challenge to building performance and longevity – and bulk water is public enemy number one. In general, there are four basic approaches to bulk water management in a….

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